McGurk Effect: The Impact of Increased Audio-Visual Perceptual Load, Saliency of Stimuli and Visual Distortion on Individual Perceptions

Ivany, Erin B. (2020) McGurk Effect: The Impact of Increased Audio-Visual Perceptual Load, Saliency of Stimuli and Visual Distortion on Individual Perceptions. Bachelor's thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Research has suggested that the likelihood of experiencing the McGurk Effect is impacted by attention and the visual clarity/distortion levels of the speaker. Further, research suggests that the affective saliency of the distractor stimulus is capable of altering the attentional state. In a 3 (saliency level) x 2 (distortion level) x 2 (audio-visual stimulus congruency) repeated measures design, the current study combines all of these components into a single investigation to examine the impact of these variables on the perception of the McGurk Effect. Importantly, while the majority of research has focused on one specific modality, the current study introduces multisensory (i.e. audio-visual) distractors. Results indicated that the presence of the McGurk Effect is dependent on the saliency of the audio-visual distractor and whether the visual field is blurred. Participants (n = 36) reported the correct audio at a significantly lower accuracy when the clips had neutral saliency in comparison to both positive saliency and negative saliency, as well as when the clips were blurred compared to when the clips were not blurred. Therefore, clips with positively or negatively salient audio-visual distractors and clips without blur were significantly more effective in reducing the perception of the McGurk Effect.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/15110
Item ID: 15110
Additional Information: “Includes bibliographical references (pages 25-27)”
Department(s): Grenfell Campus > School of Arts and Social Science > Psychology
Date: April 2020
Date Type: Submission

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