Simulating of erosion modeling using ANSYS fluid dynamics

Marrah, Aimen (2019) Simulating of erosion modeling using ANSYS fluid dynamics. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The micromechanical process of solid particle erosion can be affected by a number of factors, including impact angle, flow geometry, and particle size and shape. Erosion can also be affected by fluid properties, flow conditions, and the material comprising the impact surface. Of these several different potential impacting factors, the most critical ones for initiating erosion are particle size and matter, carrier phase viscosity, pipe diameter, velocity, and total flow rate of the second phase. Three turbulence models which are heavily dependent on flow velocities and fluid properties in their environment are k-epsilon (k-ε), k-omega (k-ω) and The Shear Stress Transport Model (sst). More extreme erosion generally occurs in gas-solid flow for geometries which experience rapid alterations in flow direction (e.g., in valves and tees) because of unstable flow and local turbulence. The present study provides results from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that feature dilute water-solid flows in complex pipelines, highlighting the dynamic behavior displayed by the flows’ entrained solid particles. Specifically, the impact of fluid velocities in relation to erosion location is tested on sand particles measuring 10, 70, 100 and 200 microns. For the CFD analysis testing, liquid velocities of 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 m/s are applied. The difference is evident between velocities of 20 m/s and 40 m/s, giving an erosion rate of 1.73 x10⁻⁴ kg/m².s and 2.11x10⁻³ kg/m².s, respectively, when the particle solid is 200

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/13763
Item ID: 13763
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 56-59).
Keywords: Erosion, Mesh, CFD, Solid Partible, Primary phase
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: May 2019
Date Type: Submission

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