Criminalizing women in the Last Best West: gender, race, and class in the Alberta Criminal Justice System, 1892-1920

Hall, Sarah (2019) Criminalizing women in the Last Best West: gender, race, and class in the Alberta Criminal Justice System, 1892-1920. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Research addressing the regional differences in patterns of criminalization between Central Canada and Western Canada has been overlooked by many historians of criminal law. This research looks into those differences and explores how the unique developments in the political, social, and economic history of Alberta influences the patterns of criminalization women of different races, and social classes experienced as Alberta transitioned from a Territory to a Province (1892-1920). The findings reveal a complex evolution of gender, race, and class discourses as Alberta’s frontier society was transformed to an agrarian society and later a mixed agrarian and industrial society as settler colonialism, temperance and social reform campaigns, and geopolitical upheaval redefined the region.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/14366
Item ID: 14366
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 89-110).
Keywords: Crime, Gender, Race, Class
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > History
Date: October 2019
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Female offenders--Alberta--History--20th century; Female offenders--Alberta--History--19th century; Alberta--Social conditions--20th century; Alberta--Social conditions--19th century.

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics