The effect of video games on the perception of aggression

Watton, Mark M. (2013) The effect of video games on the perception of aggression. Bachelor's thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The relationship between video game violence and aggression has frequently been studied in order to assess whether or not video games that portray violence lead the individuals playing them to become more aggressive (Anderson, Gentile & Buckley, 2007). However, something that has seldom been explored is whether violent video game play affects perceived aggression (i.e., whether those individuals who engage in violent game play perceive situations involving obvious aggression differently). Likewise, there has been very little research assessing differences in the perception of offline versus online gaming and gender differences in perceived aggression. In the present study differences in the perception of males versus females playing online versus offline gaming were explored. One hundred and twenty-nine participants completed a survey that required them to indicate the types of video games they play and how many hours per week they play these games. Participants read 1 of 8 possible scenarios (determined randomly) and answered questions regarding their perception of aggression. A number of significant relationships were found indicating that those who play violent video games perceive aggression as less serious. There were also differences in perception of aggression according to the gender of the perpetrator and the gender of the participant. The implications of such results could be used to implement stricter age restrictions on violent video games, as well as provide a pathway to assess gender differences in cyberbullying.

Item Type: Thesis (Bachelor's)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6371
Item ID: 6371
Additional Information: Include bibliographical references (page 26-28).
Department(s): Grenfell Campus > Division of Social Science > Psychology
Date: 2013
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Violence in video games--Psychological aspects; Video gamers--Psychology; Aggressiveness--Sex differences; Video gamers--Attitudes

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