Optimization of transition state structures using genetic algorithms

Bungay, Sharene D. (2000) Optimization of transition state structures using genetic algorithms. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Geometry optimization has long been an active research area in theoretical chemistry. Many algorithms currently exist for the optimization of minima (reactants, intermediates, and products) on a potential energy surface. However, determination of transition state structures (first order saddle points) has been an ongoing problem. The computational technique of genetic algorithms has recently been applied to optimization problems in many disciplines. Genetic algorithms are a type of evolutionary computing in which a population of individuals, whose genes collectively encode candidate solutions to the problem being solved, evolve toward a desired objective. Each generation is biased towards producing individuals which closely resemble the known desired features of the optimum. This thesis contains a discussion of existing techniques for geometry optimization, a description of genetic algorithms, and an explanation of how the genetic algorithm technique was applied to transition state optimization and incorporated into the existing ab initio package Mungauss. Results from optimizing mathematical functions, demonstrating the effectiveness of the genetic algorithm implemented to optimize first order saddle points, are presented, followed by results from the optimization of standard chemical structures used for the testing of transition state optimization methods. Finally, some ideas for future method modifications to increase the efficiency of the genetic algorithm implementation used are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1082
Item ID: 1082
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 80-82.
Department(s): ?? ComptSci ??
Science, Faculty of > Computational Science
Date: 2000
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Mathematical optimization; Genetic algorithms

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