A study of the relationships among reader self-perceptions, early reading ability, reading attitudes and gender in grade two students

Gaulton, Cecilia M. (2001) A study of the relationships among reader self-perceptions, early reading ability, reading attitudes and gender in grade two students. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

This study investigated the relationships among reader self-perceptions, early reading ability, reading attitudes and gender in grade two readers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among reader self-perceptions (observational comparison, social feedback, physiological states, and progress), early reading ability (knowledge of the alphabet, conventions of reading and writing, and meaning), attitude and gender in a group of grade two students. -- The three instruments used in this investigation were: (1) a modified version of the Reader Self-perception Scale (Henk and Melnick, 1995), (2) a test of early reading ability, Test of Early Reading Ability, TERA-2 Form A (Reid, Hresko, and Hammil 1989), and (3) attitudes toward reading were measured using the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (McKeena and Kear, 1990). -- The study was carried out with seventy-seven second grade students from a rural area. Forty-two girls and thirty-five boys participated in the study. They and their parents/guardians were the participants of a pilot project called Significant Others as Reading Teachers, SORT, for approximately one year (Oldford-Matchim, J., 1994). The project advocated the importance of significant others sharing reading and demonstrating reading practices in children's reading development. -- Results from the Reader Self-perception Scale indicated children had positive self-perceptions toward reading except when comparing their own reading to that of their classmates. An overall normal curve equivalent (NCE) score was computed from the raw scores on the TERA-2 test. The overall normal curve equivalency score revealed average performance in reading ability for the group of grade two children. The children's conventions of print scores were the highest of the three categories, followed by alphabet scores, then meaning scores. -- The Pearson-Product Moment Method was used to examine the relationships among measures of the: (1) reader self-perceptions, (2) reading ability, (3) attitude toward, (4) recreational reading, (5) attitude toward academic reading, and (6) gender. Cronbach's alpha was used to determine the reliability of the Reader Self-perception Scale and TERA-2. -- Several statistically significant relationships for this group of grade-two children were found. There was a significant relationship between children's knowledge of the conventions of print and one aspect of reader self-perceptions, question number one, "Do you think you are a good reader?", children's attitude toward recreational reading and aspects of reader self-perceptions, namely the overall scores of the Reader Self-Perception Scale, as well as the subtests of observational comparison, social feedback, and physiological states. Also, children's self concept of themselves as readers was positively related to their attitude towards recreational reading. Another significant relationship was found between children's academic reading attitude and aspects of reader self-perceptions, namely the overall scores of the Reader Self-Perception Scale, children's self-concept of themselves as readers, question number one, "Do you think you are a good reader?", observational comparison, social feedback, and physiological states. Children's reading attitude (total ERAS) and aspects of reader self-perceptions, namely the overall scores of the Reader Self-Perception Scale, question number one, "Do you think you are a good reader?", observational comparison, social feedback, and physiological states. -- The findings in this investigation are important for teachers and parents as they engage in daily reading activities with young children in the early stage of their reading development. Parents, teachers, and any significant other should be informed of all the aspects that surround the process of reading and the formation of readers' self-perceptions.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/9425
Item ID: 9425
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 116-136.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 2001
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Reading (Elementary)

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