Resource-based single industry communities: a unit of curriculum and instruction based on the theories of Mauritz Johnson and the criteria of the Canada Studies Foundation

Fagan, Lenora Perry (1974) Resource-based single industry communities: a unit of curriculum and instruction based on the theories of Mauritz Johnson and the criteria of the Canada Studies Foundation. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a unit of curriculum and instruction on resource-based single industry communities using the theories of Mauritz Johnson and the criteria of the Canada Studies Foundation. The unit which has been developed could be used as a supplement to the existing social studies programs for upper high school students. -- The unit is multimedia in nature and includes a student text, a teacher's manual, wall charts, overhead transparencies, an audio tape, and suggested activities. The "curriculum," or matrix of intended learning outcomes for the unit, was drawn from several areas of the social sciences - history, geography, sociology, anthropology, and economics - and from non-disciplined knowledge contained in magazine articles, newspapers, union records, company records, and conversations with various individuals having some knowledge of single industry communities. -- At various stages in the development of the unit subject matter specialists, social studies experts and audio-visual specialists were consulted and their suggestions were incorporated into the unit. Fry's Readability Formula (1968) was applied to the student text to ascertain whether or not the reading level was suitable for upper high school students, and Anderson's "Guiding Questions" (1972) were used throughout to assure that Johnson's Theories (1967; 1969) were being adhered to. Finally, it was placed in six classrooms in the Gander area - four grade ten and two grade eleven - for field testing. In three grade ten classes the unit was taught in totality, and in three others only short sections were used. Results of the formative evaluation showed that the unit was readable, teachable, and valid. -- The following conclusions were drawn from the study: -- 1. Johnson's theories, if used in conjunction with some criteria for selection and organization, can provide a workable model for curriculum and instructional development. -- 2. The criteria of the Canada Studies Foundation can provide much guidance for the inexperienced developer who wishes to produce curriculum and instruction materials on Canadian topics. -- 3. The unit can be successfully taught in urban and rural Newfoundland classrooms by teachers who have had no inservice training or background study on the topic of single industry communities.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7398
Item ID: 7398
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 60-64.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1974
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Johnson, Mauritz; Company towns; Community development--Study and teaching

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