Differential characteristics of higher and lower achieving Junior Division spring semester students at Memorial University

Simmonds, Anthony Joseph (1972) Differential characteristics of higher and lower achieving Junior Division spring semester students at Memorial University. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the differential characteristics of higher and lower achieving Junior Division Spring Semester students at Memorial University. Specifically, intelligence differences, personality differences, reading differences and study habits differences were studied. From a questionnaire the variables of age, availability of books at home, presence of a library in the school, parents' occupations, number of children in family, birth order, type of high school attended, religion and parents' educational level were studied. Socio-economic level was also obtained in a different manner. -- Forty-eight Spring Semester students from the total population of higher and lower achievers comprised the two major groups. They were matched on the variables of high school marks (Grade XI average), faculty, and rural-urban factor. The intelligence differences were determined by the Otis Quick Scoring Test of Mental Ability. Personality differences were determined by the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule. Reading differences were determined by the Nelson-Denny Reading Test, and study habits differences were determined by the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes. A questionnaire helped to determine differences between the other variables. Socio-economic level was obtained from the Department of Labour. By applying a two-way analysis of variance, it was possible to detect significant differences between intelligence, personality, reading ability, and study habits and attitudes. The variables listed on the questionnaire plus the socio-economic factor were then analyzed. -- It was found that hypothesis number one which postulated a significant difference between intelligence levels of higher and lower achievers at the college level was accepted. Further analysis revealed partial acceptance of hypothesis number two which postulated significant differences on the personality traits of need for achievement, order and endurance. -- Analysis of data showed acceptance of hypothesis number three which postulated a significant difference between the higher and lower achievers on study habits. -- Hypothesis number four which postulated a significant difference between the higher and lower achievers on speed reading was rejected. -- None of the groups differed significantly on the variables of age, availability of books at home, presence of a library in the school, parental level of education, number in family, birth order, type of high school attended, religion, parents' occupations, and socio-economic level. -- The higher achievers at the college level scored significantly higher than the lower achievers on the following: intelligence, need for order, intraception, dominance, change, vocabulary, total, delay avoidance, work methods, study habits, teacher acceptance, educational acceptance, study attitudes, and study orientation. -- The higher and lower achievers at college did not differ significantly on the following: the need to achieve, deference, exhibition, autonomy, affiliation, succorance, abasement, nurturance, endurance, heterosexuality, aggression, comprehension, and speed reading. -- The higher and lower achievers at the high school level did not differ significantly on the following: intelligence, the need to achieve, order, exhibition, autonomy, affiliation, intraception, succorance, dominance, abasement, change, endurance, heterosexuality, aggression, vocabulary, comprehension, total, speed reading, delay avoidance, study habits, teacher acceptance, study attitudes, and study orientation. -- The higher and lower achievers at the college or high school level did not differ significantly on any of the variables of: age, availability of books at home, presence of a library in the school, fathers' and mothers' level of education, number in family, birth order, type of high school attended, religion, fathers' and mothers' occupation level, and socio-economic level.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7198
Item ID: 7198
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves [89]-91.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1972
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Academic achievement; College students--Newfoundland and Labrador

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