The experiences of women who undergo an emergency cesarean section: a phenomenological study.

Sullivan, Julie Patricia (2014) The experiences of women who undergo an emergency cesarean section: a phenomenological study. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

In this phenomenological study, the lived experiences of women who gave birth via an emergency cesarean section (EmCS) were explored. Ten women from the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, who experienced an EmCS, were interviewed and their narrative accounts were analyzed using van Manen’s hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Analysis of the interview transcriptions revealed six themes: (a) disruption of a “normal” birth; (b) losing control: “given to the healthcare system”; (c) pervasive sense of fear and urgency; (d) being alone without needed support; (e) missing pieces: losing touch with reality; and (f) missing out on feeling like a new mother. The findings of this study will potentially enhance awareness and understanding of the experience of an EmCS and could be used to improve the care of women who undergo an EmCS. The findings could also be used to direct future research regarding this type of birth experience.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6326
Item ID: 6326
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 90-101).
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: May 2014
Date Type: Submission

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