Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Difficult Wound Healing in Newfoundland and Labrador

Navarro, Pablo and Bornstein, Stephen (2012) Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Difficult Wound Healing in Newfoundland and Labrador. Project Report. Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research.

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Abstract

Research Question: What does the scientific literature tell us about the clinical and economic effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatment for difficult wound healing (i.e., diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, delayed radiation-induced injury, thermal burns, skin grafts and flaps, and revascularization after organ transplantation) considering the expected patient populations and given the social, geographic, economic and political contexts of Newfoundland and Labrador? Results: Research evidence supports HBOT as clinically-effective and cost-effective for treating diabetic foot ulcers. While evidence supports HBOT as clinically-effective for treating delayed radiation-induced injuries of the head, neck and pelvis, there is insufficient evidence as to whether HBOT is cost-effective for the same injuries. There is insufficient evidence about the clinical or cost effectiveness of HBOT for: pressure ulcers, delayed radiation-induced injuries in other parts of the body, thermal burns, skin grafts, skin flaps, or revascularization after organ transplantation. The cost effectiveness of HBOT for appropriate non-healing wounds increases as the number of treated patients increases. The appropriate and timely referral of patients for HBOT treatment improves with integration of wound-care management into existing chronic and acute health service programs. Overall, evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of HBOT for non-healing wounds is limited. As a result, future studies will be needed to augment the evidence base concerning HBOT for a number of conditions.

Item Type: Report (Project Report)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/630
Item ID: 630
Keywords: Contextualized Health Research Synthesis Program, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, Difficult Wounds, Applied Health Research
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Divisions > Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research
Date: June 2012
Date Type: Publication
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