Electrochemically assisted assembly of collagen membranes and collagen-calcium phosphate composite materials

Mani, Ramesh Kumar (2012) Electrochemically assisted assembly of collagen membranes and collagen-calcium phosphate composite materials. Doctoral (PhD) thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

I have designed bioactive collagen-based materials using electrochemical synthesis methods. Preparation of these collagenous materials involves assembly of fibrils from collagen monomers; inorganic-protein composites can be formed by subsequent electrochemically induced precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals. These collagen-calcium phosphate composites are stiffer than the original collagen membranes. The electrochemically assisted mineral precipitation can yield several different calcium phosphate phases (including hydroxyapatite, brushite, or amorphous calcium phosphate) depending on electrolyte composition. Change in the electrolyte composition (by adding different ions), electrolyte p H or duration of the applied field produces membranes with a range of Young's moduli. Single particle tracking reveals that changing the electrolyte composition changes the internal pore structure of the formed collagen membrane. Biocompatibility studies show that cells grow very well on the electrochemically aggregated collagen membranes when they are used as a supportive matrix. Since a major portion of a cornea is made up of collagen, our collagen membranes may be useful as a matrix for artificial cornea applications.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral (PhD))
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6149
Item ID: 6149
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Chemistry
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Biomedical materials--Synthesis; Biomedical materials--Electric properties; Membranes (Biology)--Synthesis; Calcium phosphate--Synthesis; Electrochemistry;

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