The effect of training in referential communication on social competence in developmentally delayed school children

Galutira, Beverly (1984) The effect of training in referential communication on social competence in developmentally delayed school children. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This study is an investigation of the effects of training in referential communication on peer acceptance and teacher ratings of seven to nine year old developmentally delayed school children. Twenty-four subjects were divided into three groups: Treatment, attention control, and no treatment control. It was predicted that (1) referential communication would improve with training, (2) as referential communication improved there would be an increase in the subjects' ratings of peer acceptance, and (3) improvements would occur in teacher ratings of peer interactions but not necessarily in ratings of compliance. -- The results of the experiment supported the hypotheses. Children who received training in referential communication demonstrated improvement following six weekly training sessions. A two-month followup assessment showed that training was effective in producing improvements in both peer acceptance ratings and teacher ratings in the treatment group, but not in the control groups. There were no improvements in ratings of compliance. The potential benefits of referential communication as a factor in social competence are discussed, and future research needs are indicated.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5891
Item ID: 5891
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 50-56.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 1984
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Interpersonal communication in children; Social skills; Oral communication

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