The molarity concept : identification of a learning hierarchy and related students' errors

Hopkins, Barbara Lillian (1985) The molarity concept : identification of a learning hierarchy and related students' errors. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to identify learning hierarchy related to the concept of molarity. Gagne’s learning hierarchy model is used to hypothesize the hierarchy to which, in turn, several validation methods are applied. The validation process facilitated the identification of specific errors that students made in solving problems related to the skills comprising the hierarchy and information was acquired regarding the applicability of Gagne’s model to the concept of molarity. -- The sample was comprised of 144 grade ten chemistry students. After instruction on molarity by the classroom teacher, the students were tested on the skills of the hierarchy and assigned individual remedial work from an instructional booklet. The booklet was designed to address the areas of incompetence identified from the students’ test responses. The students were retested after the initial testing. The data were analyzed using two psychometric techniques and one transfer technique. Finally, incorrect test responses were scrutinized to detect the kinds of errors made. -- The two psychometric methods, namely one developed by Dayton and Macready (1976) and the other by Airasian and Bart (1975), gave results which indicated that while the hypothesized hierarchy comprised of 14 skills is not supported in its entirety, a revised hierarchy omitting two of the skills is considered valid. The hierarchy was also investigated for transfer validity. Again, good support for the hierarchy was observed. Finally, a number of student errors were identified by the test data. These are reported.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/5190
Item ID: 5190
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 66-71.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1985
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Learning, Psychology of; Chemistry--Study and teaching

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