The effect of test time limits on performance for controlled amounts of study

Wilbur, Brian Dean (1975) The effect of test time limits on performance for controlled amounts of study. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The study investigated the relationship between imposed test time limits and students' test performance for controlled amounts of student exposure to examined information. -- Nine classes of grade eight students within the Avalon North Integrated School District were randomly selected and randomly assigned to one of the nine possible treatment conditions. -- The material relevant to the achievement measure was contained in a ten minute audio-filmstrip presentation and was supplemented with a summary to be read by the student. The three levels of the exposure to information variable included one and two exposures to the examined information, and a no exposure condition that served as a control condition. The three levels of the time limit variable, short, medium and untimed, were established by a pretest of the items selected for the final achievement measure. -- The results indicated a significant positive correlation between correct responses and omitted items. Apparently, the more information Ss had about the tested material, the more they omitted making responses about which they were not certain. Conversely, the less information Ss had about the tested material, the less they omitted making responses about which they were uncertain. The results also indicated a significant negative correlation between available time and omitted responses. As time increased, all Ss seemed to construct responses rather than omit items. The exposure to material variable produced a significant main effect. Both exposure treatments were significantly different from the control condition but they were not significantly different from each other. For the number of correct responses there were no significant differences for the various time conditions.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/4401
Item ID: 4401
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 26-27.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1975
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Educational tests and measurements

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