Low density lipoprotein cholesterol control status among Canadians at risk for cardiovascular disease: findings from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network Database

Asghari, Shabnam and Aref-Eshghi, Erfan and Leung, Jason and Godwin, Marshall and Duke, Pauline S. and Williamson, Tyler and Mahdavian, Masoud (2015) Low density lipoprotein cholesterol control status among Canadians at risk for cardiovascular disease: findings from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network Database. Lipids in Health and Disease, 14 (60). ISSN 1476-511X

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Abstract

Background To determine the prevalence of uncontrolled LDL-C in patients with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks across Canada and to examine its related factors. Methods Non-pregnant adults >20 years-old, who had a lipid test completed between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 and were included in the Canadian Primary Care Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) database were studied. The Framingham-Risk-Score was calculated to determine the risk levels. A serum LDL-C level of >2.0 mmol/L was considered as being poorly controlled. Patients with a previous record of a cerebrovascular accident, peripheral artery disease, or an ischemic heart disease were regarded as those under secondary prevention. Logistic regression modeling was performed to examine the factors associated with the LDL-C control. Results A total of 6,405 high-risk patients were included in the study and, of this population, 68 % had a suboptimal LDL-C, which was significantly associated with the female gender (OR: 3.26; 95 % CI: 2.63–4.05, p < 0.0001) and no medication therapy (OR: 6.31, 95 % CI: 5.21–7.65, p < 0.0001). Those with comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and smokers had a better LDL-C control. Rural residents (OR: 0.64, 95 % CI: 0.52–0.78, p < 0.0001), and those under secondary prevention (OR: 0.42; 95 % CI: 0.35–0.51, p < 0.0001), were also more likely to have a better LDL-C control. Conclusion A high proportion of high-cardiac risk patients in Canadian primary care settings have suboptimal LDL-C control. A lack of medication therapy appears to be the major contributing factor to this situation.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/11875
Item ID: 11875
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Keywords: Dyslipidemia, Canada, LDL-C control, CPCSSN
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 24 June 2015
Date Type: Publication
Geographic Location: Canada
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