Living with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

Keeping, Lisa M. (1997) Living with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experience of living with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) from the perspective of individuals who had used this form of renal replacement therapy. A large proportion of previous research on dialysis focused on hemodialysis with fewer studies on CAPD. Only four studies explored the dialysis experience from the perspective of the patient. -- A phenomenological method of inquiry was used to investigate the experience of individuals living with this type of renal replacement therapy. An unstructured formal interview guide was used to obtain tape recorded interviews from 2 males and 6 females with CAPD. Each tape recorded interview was coded and transcribed into written text Data analysis was conducted using van Manen's (1990) guidelines. Six themes were identified: (a) Maintaining hope: Cautioned optimism, (b) A different self: Presence of the catheter and dialysate, (c) The regimentation of life: Making an exchange every six hours, (d) Familiar intrusions: Growing accustomed to the procedure, (e) Being free: A paradoxical freedom, and (f) Sharing the responsibility: Importance of a support person. The essence of the experience was CAPD represented gain in the lives of individuals who had lost a great deal with end-stage renal disease - gain in the shadow of loss. Recommendations which arose from the findings of the study that had significance for nurses practicing in the field of dialysis were also discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/1094
Item ID: 1094
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 105-112.
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis--Patients; Self care, Health--Newfoundland and Labrador

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