To screen or not to screen: a descriptive analysis of factors influencing women's decisions to continue breast screening

Wells, Julie (2004) To screen or not to screen: a descriptive analysis of factors influencing women's decisions to continue breast screening. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (14Mb)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence women's decisions to continue breast screening. A secondary objective was to investigate and compare the perceptions of service and health care providers about their roles in this decision. -- Background: Breast screening has the potential to reduce mortality from breast cancer by as much as one-third. In order to accomplish this, women must continue screening after their initial mammogram. Preliminary analysis of data from the Breast Screening Program for Newfoundland and Labrador (BSPNL) revealed that approximately one-in-five women who visit the St. John's Breast Screening Centre do not return for a second mammogram. -- Method: Data from the BSPNL database were analyzed using descriptive statistics to determine which demographic, socio-economic and screening behaviour variables were associated with returning for a second mammogram. In addition, a convenience sample of physicians received a questionnaire measuring their knowledge and attitudes about breast screening. Finally, interviews were conducted with staff and clients of the St. John's Breast Screening Centre to assess their views on the decision to continue screening. -- Results: Several demographic and screening behaviour variables were significantly associated with the decision to continue screening. Interviews with clients of the Breast Screening Centre also revealed attitudinal differences between women who continue screening and those who do not. -- Each group of participants identified the primary role for physicians as providing encouragement to continue screening. The primary role for staff was viewed as ensuring a positive screening experience. There were differences between the groups with respect to their views as to how these roles could be performed effectively. -- Conclusion: The decision to continue breast screening is complex and influenced by a number of variables. Suggestions for methods to encourage women to continue screening as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/9923
Item ID: 9923
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 106-113.
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 2004
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Breast--Cancer--Diagnosis--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Breast--Examination--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Women's health services--Utilization--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's.
Medical Subject Heading: Breast Neoplasms--prevention & control--Newfoundland and Labrador --St. John's; Mass Screening.

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics