Chronic resistance training enhances the spinal excitability of the biceps brachii in the non-dominant arm at moderate contraction intensities

Philpott, Devin (2015) Chronic resistance training enhances the spinal excitability of the biceps brachii in the non-dominant arm at moderate contraction intensities. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The objective of this thesis was to examine how chronic resistance training influences corticospinal excitability (CE) of the Biceps Brachii in the non-dominant arm. Seven chronic resistance trained (RT) and six non-resistance trained (NRT) completed four sets of five s pseudo-randomized contractions at 100,90,75,50 and 25% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the contractions, participants received transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transmastoid electrical stimulation (TMES) and peripheral nerve stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEP), cervicomedullary evoked potentials (CMEP) and maximal muscle compound action potentials (Mmax) respectively. All MEPs and CMEPs were normalized to M-max. CMEPs were found to be significantly higher at moderate contraction intensities in the RT group. Results indicate that spinal, but not supraspinal excitability is enhanced at moderate contraction intensities in chronic resistance trained individuals.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/9794
Item ID: 9794
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords: corticospinal excitability, chronic resistance training, biceps brachii, elbow flexion, motoneuron
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: June 2015
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Isometric exercise; Muscle contraction; Arm--Muscles; Evoked potentials (Electrophysiology); Action potentials (Electrophysiology)

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