Differences in corticospinal excitability to the biceps brachii between arm cycling and tonic contraction are not evident at the immediate onset of movement

Forman, Davis (2015) Differences in corticospinal excitability to the biceps brachii between arm cycling and tonic contraction are not evident at the immediate onset of movement. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (623Kb)

Abstract

With the use of indirect stimulation techniques, it is possible to examine the basic, underlying mechanisms involved with the neuronal control of voluntary motor outputs in humans. By developing a better understanding of how the central nervous system functions during these outputs, we allow for the possibility of improving current rehabilitative and therapeutic strategies for people with neurological injuries and/or diseases. Recently, this type of work has demonstrated that corticospinal excitability is not task-dependent prior to the initiation of a motor output. However, substantial evidence has shown that corticospinal excitability is task-dependent during motor outputs. Considering these two findings, it is highly plausible that a transition occurs in corticospinal excitability from task-independent to task-dependent as movement progresses from rest to steady-state. The timeline of this transition is poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was examine the possible task-dependent transition in corticospinal excitability from rest to steady-state arm cycling.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/9793
Item ID: 9793
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords: Initiation, Transmastoid, Transcranial, MEP, CMEP
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: August 2015
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Arm exercises--Physiological aspects; Excitation (Physiology); Muscle contraction; Arm--Movements

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics