The development of visual self-recognition in infancy : cross-sectional and longitudinal samples

Edison, Shannon C. (2001) The development of visual self-recognition in infancy : cross-sectional and longitudinal samples. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

In the past, mark-directed behavior in the rouge task, using one's name or personal pronouns, identifying one's photo image, and being able to locate an object that has been reflected in a mirror have been seen as components of self-knowledge. In the present study, tasks measuring these abilities were given to a cross-sectional group consisting of 90 children (on one occasion) ranging in age from 15 to 23 months of age. An additional longitudinal group consisting of 10 children was given the same tasks bi-weekly between the age of 15 and 23 months of age. Results indicate: (1) these abilities develop independently and that, developmentally, children recognize their mirror image before they begin using personal pronouns, which occurs before children are able to recognize their photo image, (2) the ability to locate an object reflected in a mirror does not fit into this developmental scale, (3) neither knowledge of the reflective properties of mirrors nor the amount of exposure to mirrors has an influence on the development of mirror self-recognition, (4) there appears to be a sudden spurt in the development of mirror self-recognition at 17 months of age and photo self-recognition at 22 months of age, but the development of the use of personal pronouns appears to develop in a linear pattern, (5) there does not appear to be a clear pattern of development in the ability to locate an object reflected in a mirror. Comparison of data from the longitudinal and cross-sectional groups revealed that (6) practice effects were apparent among the longitudinal group for the mirror self-recognition, photo, and toy tasks, but not for the development of the use of personal pronouns and (7) there was also a great deal of between and within variability in the development of each skill measured. Finally, no gender effects were present among any measures in the present study.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/9344
Item ID: 9344
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 61-68.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 2001
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Self-perception in infants--Testing; Self-perception in children--Testing

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