Composition, analysis and diversion alternatives of the solid waste stream at Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland

Bongard, Rivendell K. (1997) Composition, analysis and diversion alternatives of the solid waste stream at Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This report was developed on the initiative of the Waterford Hospital Foundation to integrate an Ever Green Recycling depot in cooperation with Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN). A three week solid waste audit was performed on the St. John's campus to determine the current waste composition and generation rates. The methods presently employed for managing the solid waste stream and the amount of compo stable and recyclable materials presently landfiiled were identified. Public awareness and attitudes towards recycling on campus were also surveyed. -- Memorial University generates 3,500 short tons of solid waste per annum (2.03 lb/capita-day) and does not have a comprehensive solid waste management policy. According to the audit results and the Newfoundland recycling regulations, recyclable materials (office paper, newspaper, corrugated cardboard, plastics, Tetra Pak, glass, tin and aluminum cans) constitute 29.86% and compostable matter (food and yard wastes) represents 11.79% of MUN's solid waste stream. -- Furthermore, this study attempts to identify procedures for waste reduction and the recovery of recyclable and compostable materials. Appropriate waste management could reduce the present waste collection expenditures of $110,000 per annum for the main campus by 42% to $64,000. Cooperation with the WHF could transform the recyclable waste into a minimum revenue of $42,000 annually. Also, approximately 460 short tons of waste could be diverted into compost to condition local topsoil.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/919
Item ID: 919
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 73-74
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Environmental Science
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador--Avalon Peninsula--St. John's
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Recycling (Waste, etc.)--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Universities and colleges--Waste disposal--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's

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