Recovery from neuromuscular fatigue following plyometric and resisted squat exercises to exhaustion

Wadden, Katie Patricia (2010) Recovery from neuromuscular fatigue following plyometric and resisted squat exercises to exhaustion. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the recovery from neuromuscular fatigue following plyometric and resisted squat exercises performed to exhaustion. Previous research has shown that recovery from neuromuscular fatigue is dependent on training status of the subject and the time, type and intensity of the exercise performed. In spite of this finding, the recovery period prescribed for plyometric training is similar to that of slow movement resisted exercise training. Plyometric and resisted squat exercises utilize a unique yet natural movement known as the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC), however due to the differing movement velocities of the exercises, the nature of the SSC performed is very different. This difference is believed to impose distinctive mechanical and neural stresses on the musculoskeletal system. Ten moderately trained subjects and four highly trained subjects completed two SSC trials to exhaustion. Subjects performed continuous drop jumps from a 30 cm platform during the plyometric trial and continuous squats with a load of 65% of their one-repetition maximum during the resisted squat trial. There was no difference in the neuromuscular recovery response following plyometric and resisted squat exercises performed to exhaustion. However, the duration of the plyometric trial was dependent on the training status of the subject; highly trained (HT) subjects (athletes who trained for their sport for 6 or more hours a week) (68.2%) than the moderately (MT) subjects (individuals who participated in 3 or more hours of physical activity a week) and the duration of the plyometric trial was significantly longer (67.1%) than resisted squat trial for the HT subjects. The duration of the trials did not differ for the MT subjects. Changes in neuromuscular properties following plyometric and resisted squat trials to exhaustion are independent of the type of exercise, duration of the trial and training status of the subject.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8870
Item ID: 8870
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of
Date: 2010
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fatigue; Muscle contraction; Plyometrics--Physiological aspects

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