Exploring the lived experience of nursing students who encounter inter-colleague violence during clinical placements: a phenomenological study

Churchill, Natasha C. (2015) Exploring the lived experience of nursing students who encounter inter-colleague violence during clinical placements: a phenomenological study. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Inter-colleague violence during clinical placements can profoundly affect student well being, learning, and professional socialization. The experiences of students who encounter inter-colleague violence in the clinical setting have been examined by researchers internationally. There is a significant lack of research on the experiences of Canadian students in the literature. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of nursing students who encounter inter-colleague violence during clinical placements. The population of interest was baccalaureate nursing students in an Atlantic province in Canada. Eight students representing three programs from two different sites participated in the study. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed for analysis. Five themes were determined using the approach of van Manen (1990/1997). The identified themes are a sense of foreboding, playing hide and seek, I had no options, we are all in this together, and letting go, moving on. Similarities were noted between the participants’ experiences and those of nursing students in other studies. Apparent in this study but not evident in the literature was the influence of word-of-mouth communication between students prior to the start of clinical placements. Word-of-mouth communication included the verbal exchange of stories and rumours about clinical instructors, nurses, and clinical units. Implications for nursing education, administration, and research are discussed and include the importance of teaching students to recognize inter-colleague violence and providing safe, supportive environments for students to report incidents of inter-colleague violence.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8437
Item ID: 8437
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 99-111).
Keywords: Nursing, Students, Inter-colleague, Violence, Clinical
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: February 2015
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Nursing students--Psychology; Nursing students--Violence against; Violence in the workplace; Violence in hospitals
Medical Subject Heading: Students, Nursing--psychology; Workplace Violence; Hospitals.

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