Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study

Kibele, Armin and Classen, Claudia and Muehlbauer, Thomas and Granacher, Urs and Behm, David G. (2014) Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 6 (30). ISSN 2052-1847

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Abstract

Background: In the past, plyometric training (PT) has been predominantly performed on stable surfaces. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine effects of a 7-week lower body PT on stable vs. unstable surfaces. This type of exercise condition may be denoted as metastable equilibrium. Methods: Thirty-three physically active male sport science students (age: 24.1 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to a PT group (n = 13) exercising on stable (STAB) and a PT group (n = 20) on unstable surfaces (INST). Both groups trained countermovement jumps, drop jumps, and practiced a hurdle jump course. In addition, high bar squats were performed. Physical fitness tests on stable surfaces (hexagonal obstacle test, countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, left-right hop, dynamic and static balance tests, and leg extension strength) were used to examine the training effects. Results: Significant main effects of time (ANOVA) were found for the countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, hexagonal test, dynamic balance, and leg extension strength. A significant interaction of time and training mode was detected for the countermovement jump in favor of the INST group. No significant improvements were evident for either group in the left-right hop and in the static balance test. Conclusions: These results show that lower body PT on unstable surfaces is a safe and efficient way to improve physical performance on stable surfaces.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8262
Item ID: 8262
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Keywords: Instability resistance training, Stretch-shortening cycle, Physical fitness test, Balance training
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: 17 July 2014
Date Type: Publication
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