Change blindness and the sequential lineup: age-related comparisons

Canning, Jon (2014) Change blindness and the sequential lineup: age-related comparisons. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (2259Kb)

Abstract

Change blindness (CB) refers to a lack of awareness regarding changes that occur within our environment. Recently, CB has been discussed as a potential factor that increases false eyewitness identifications when one’s view of the culprit is obstructed. CB has not been studied in a forensic setting with seniors. Furthermore, past CB research has failed to consider how an alternative procedure to the simultaneous lineup may affect false identifications due to CB. In this study, a sample of young adults (n = 90) and seniors (n = 90) viewed one of two mock-theft videos where the culprit changed (CB video) or did not change (control video) during the video. To address identification, culprit-present and culprit-absent sequential lineups were used. Results indicated that 28.9% of young adults and 37.8% of seniors displayed CB (p = .46), but surprisingly, it was not found that CB affected their identification accuracy. Findings are presented in terms of the potential benefits of the sequential lineup in reducing the effects of CB.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8145
Item ID: 8145
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 52-56).
Keywords: change blindness, young adults, seniors, sequential lineup, eyewitness, identification
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: August 2014
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Change blindness; Police lineups; Young adults--Psychology; Older people--Psychology

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics