Biomechanical changes of acupuncture treatment for lower back range of motion : a clinical study to bridge the concept of traditional Chinese acupuncture with western scientific evidence of the efficacy of acupuncture treatment

Liu, Xiao Hong (2014) Biomechanical changes of acupuncture treatment for lower back range of motion : a clinical study to bridge the concept of traditional Chinese acupuncture with western scientific evidence of the efficacy of acupuncture treatment. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Acupuncture treatment remains one of the most common treatments for lower back pain. Yet, there is very little research to show that acupuncture will also improve mobility and function of the lower back. This study attempted to assess the effectiveness of an acupuncture treatment protocol on lower back pain and lower back range of motion. Three acupuncture treatments were provided for 21 participants (mean age: 44.6 +/- 10.9 years) reporting lower back pain averaging 6.8 years with an average 6.3 pain score. A lumbar motion monitor was used to record trunk kinematics in 3-dimensions - the sagittal, lateral and twist planes - before and after treatments. Using pretest-posttest comparisons following three acupuncture treatments, 80.95% of oarticipants exhibited an increased sagittal range of motion. Changes in angular range of motion were statistically significant in 3-dimensions. However, lifting and lowering tasks were not statistically significant. This study suggests that acupuncture treatments can increase a particpant’s angular range of motion as well as to possibly improve the function of lifting tasks. Three acupuncture treatments may actually demonstrate the earliest improvement that may be expected for treating lower back pain.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8116
Item ID: 8116
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 49-52).
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: June 2014
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Back--Acupuncture; Backache--Treatment; Back--Movements; Lumbar vertebrae--Mechanical properties

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