Simulated motion negatively affects motor task but not neuromuscular performance

Pearcey, Gregory (2014) Simulated motion negatively affects motor task but not neuromuscular performance. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The objectives of this thesis were 1) to describe how motor task and neuromuscular performance is affected by various types of environmental perturbations and 2) to examine the effects of simulated motion on motor task and neuromuscular performance, conduct an experiment to examine the effects of one hour of simulated ship motion on motor task and neuromuscular performance. Sixteen males participated in two one-hour experimental testing conditions; 1) motion and 2) control. Motor task performance was measured through a simple reaction time and computerized visuomotor accuracy tracking task, while neuromuscular performance was measured through maximal voluntary contractions, voluntary activation, evoked muscle contractile properties and biceps brachii electromyography of the elbow flexors. Results indicated that motor task but not neuromuscular performance was affected by simulated motion due to ongoing sensorimotor adaptation that results in an overload of cognitive resources.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/8115
Item ID: 8115
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 56-66).
Department(s): Human Kinetics and Recreation, School of > Kinesiology
Date: July 2014
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Muscle strength--Testing; Fatigue; Human locomotion--Physiological effect; Motor ability--Testing

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