Creative imagination and psychological distortion in Joyce Cary's characters

Penney, Sandra Gaye (1980) Creative imagination and psychological distortion in Joyce Cary's characters. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The purpose of this thesis is to consider the concept of creativity in Joyce Cary's approach to character. Cary's major definitive characters are possessed of creative imagination, a quality which enables them to shape reality in a unique and characteristic way. Although some major characters may be perceived as archetypes - the artist, the woman, the conservative, the politician - each is very much an individual. Cary does not create inexplicable characters approaching in complexity the dimensions of real life people; instead, his major characters may best be categorized as psychologically grotesque. This results from their being driven by personal fantasy or creative imagination to structure a private world. An associated theme is the multiplicity of reality; that is, reality differs for each character because of this creative imagination. This consideration dictates Cary's ultimate choice of the trilogy format which challenges the reader to evaluate each character's vision of reality and judge each character by the quality of his vision. For some characters - Aissa, Mr. Johnson, Sara and Gulley - creative imagination is a source of joy and strength; for Chester Nimmo, it is a source of evil. Cary's artistic development is largely determined by his gradual absorption with characters possessing creative imagination. His early works are marred by the separation of character from idea, from an excessive amount of exposition. But when character and idea become one, then Cary's novels are important works of art.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7993
Item ID: 7993
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 238-247.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > English Language and Literature
Date: 1980
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Cary, Joyce, 1887-1957--Characters

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