A case study of the developmental differences in pattern processing abilities in young children

Melvin, Edith Dianne (1984) A case study of the developmental differences in pattern processing abilities in young children. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

This study was undertaken because of the perceived need for information regarding how young children process patterns. The purpose of the study was to look into the pattern recognition abilities of young children. Specifically, the abilities of children at different levels of development, within a Piagetian framework, were examined. A review of the literature revealed the variables which had been shown to be relevent to pattern recognition as well as the various explanations for how patterns are processed. -- A case study research design was decided upon and a purposive sample was chosen of 97 children from grades one and two in a rural school in Newfoundland. The group's mean age was 90.64 months. -- The sample was first administered several standard Piagetian-type tasks which differentiated conservers from non-conservers. Several observations were made regarding the role played by age as a variable in level of development, and the role played by school experience as a variable in level of development. Specific sub-groups of the original sample were defined as Pre-Operational and Concrete Operational based on the findings from the Piagetian instrument. -- Finally, these two sub-groups were given several patterning tasks in which they were required to extend a given pattern. The results from this instrument were examined to compare the two groups on rate of success, the tendency to impose a pattern in an erroneous response and the type of errors committed. -- The data was analyzed using non-parametric statistics, and results were not generalized beyond this sample. -- The findings seemed to show that while age did not seem important as a variable in determining Piagetian level, grade level did seem to show importance as a variable. Also, developmental level did seem to differentiate the more successful pattern solvers from the less successful. Error types seemed to vary for the two levels, however both groups seemed predisposed to imposing a pattern, even in an erroneous response. -- The thesis concluded with a set of recommendations for researchers and educators.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7805
Item ID: 7805
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 89-92.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1984
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Pattern perception; Problem solving in children; Mathematics--Study and teaching (Primary); Cognition in children

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