Acculturation, family factors and schooling in the Central Arctic

Wiseman, Thomas Joe (1980) Acculturation, family factors and schooling in the Central Arctic. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Using a locally adapted version of ten measures of attitudes which Joseph Kahl (1965) felt contributed to an accurate measure of achievement orientation, the value orientations of 57 students, both Inuit and White, in two Central Arctic communities, Cambridge Bay and Pelly Bay, were investigated. As well, the effects of ethnicity, year in school, father's occupation, sex and self-concept of academic ability upon verbal ability and four value orientations - orientation towards accomplishment, orientation towards achievement, orientation towards the future, and orientation towards integration with relatives - were investigated. -- Pearson correlation coefficients were used to estimate the parameters of the models. Regression analysis was used to determine the effects of the independent upon the intervening and dependent variables. -- Ethnicity, year in school and father's occupation all were found to have moderate effects upon verbal ability with White students having a higher verbal ability than Inuit students, students who had been in school longer having higher verbal abilities, and students whose fathers had higher status occupations having higher verbal ability. -- For the orientation towards accomplishment, it was found that White students were less modern than Inuit students. For the orientation towards integration with relatives, White students were found to be more modern than Inuit students. -- Students who had been in school longer than other students were found to be more modern in their orientations towards achievement and integration with relatives and less modern in their orientation towards the future. -- Students whose fathers had a higher status occupation than other students were found to be more modern in their orientations towards achievement and integration with relatives and less modern on their orientation towards accomplishment. -- Girls were found to have a more modern orientation towards achievement and a less modern orientation towards the future than boys. -- Students with a higher self-concept of academic ability than other students were found to have a more modern orientation towards accomplishment and less modern orientations towards achievement and integration with relatives. -- Students with a higher verbal ability than other students were found to have a more modern orientation towards integration with relatives and less modern orientations towards achievement and the future.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7734
Item ID: 7734
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 94-101.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1980
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Northwest Territories
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Education--Social aspects--Northwest Territories; Acculturation--Northwest Territories; Multicultural education--Northwest Territories

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