A heritage portrayed: nationalist theatre in Newfoundland, 1972-1982

Drodge, Janice Ann (1982) A heritage portrayed: nationalist theatre in Newfoundland, 1972-1982. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (30Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

This thesis concerns the ethnic and nationalist dimensions of alternate theatre in Newfoundland. More specifically, it deals with the strategies by which elements of nationalism and ethnicity (or ethnic identity) are incorporated and transmitted via the medium of theatre. -- The analysis focuses on three St. John's-based theatre companies, namely; The Mummers Troupe, Codco, and Rising Tide Theatre, and covers the time period from 1972 to the present. These groups have been among the most visible and active "conveyors" of ethnic and nationalist sentiments in Newfoundland, to an audience that frequently includes a mainland in addition to a significant local contingent. -- The development of nationalist theatre is examined within the context of the wider "cultural renaissance" commencing in the 1960's, and which resulted in a renewal of emphasis on indigenous and traditional forms of cultural expression such as music, crafts and literature. The socio-economic and cultural roots of both phenomena are investigated in historic and contemporary terms. It is concluded that nationalist theatre evolved in response and in reaction to the perceived loss of cultural pride and identity, and the erosion of traditional values and forms following Newfoundland's union with Canada in 1949. -- As it is the nature of theatre to not only provide entertainment, but to also reflect a society's face to itself in a very immediate and compelling way, it represents a type of artistic expression particularly suited to the above form of inquiry. This is all the more so when the dramatic works themselves convey perspectives and themes indigenous and often unique to their own society and time. In Newfoundland theatre, this is demonstrated in both the dominant and recurring themes found within the plays of the Mummers Troupe, Codco, and Rising Tide Theatre, and in the stated motivations and philosophies of the actors themselves. -- The identity expressed in nationalist theatre is described as an ethnic one and nationalism is interpreted as a response to threatened identity as well as a means by which to re-assert the "sense of peoplehood" or "uniqueness" that distinguishes Newfoundlanders from other Canadians.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7690
Item ID: 7690
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves [177]-190.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Anthropology
Date: August 1982
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Mummers Troupe; Codco (Theater company); Rising Tide Theatre; Theater--Newfoundland and Labrador; Nationalism--Newfoundland and Labrador

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics