A study of some factors affecting blood-feeding, autogeny and fecundity of Simulium vittatum Zetterstedt and Prosilium mixtum Syme and Davies

Mokry, Joseph Edward (1979) A study of some factors affecting blood-feeding, autogeny and fecundity of Simulium vittatum Zetterstedt and Prosilium mixtum Syme and Davies. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The survival of female Simulium vittatum in vials was greater (85%) when males were present than when females were held alone (67%). A preponderance of males, however, resulted in decreased female survival (46%). Sucrose was found to greatly increase the fecundity of autogenous female S. vittatum (265 oocytes / female). Prosimulium mixtum females were more fecund after feeding on human blood than on either duck or goose bloods, 276 oocytes / female and 253 / female, respectively. Human blood was also digested more rapidly by these flies than was avian blood. A blood-meal significantly increased the number of mature oocytes that S. vittatum females developed during the autogenous gonotrophic cycle. It was shown that this blood-meal compensated females for poor larval nutrition. The effects of larval nutrition were correlated with adult female fecundity. Poorly-fed larvae produced small, less fecund females while larvae fed on richer diets yielded females that were larger and produced a greater number of mature oocytes / female. Larger and younger females of S. vittatum fed more avidly than did other females. The relationship of these results to autogeny and black fly behaviour in the field was discussed. Female S. vittatum and P. Mixtum fed well on human blood (73% and 77%, respectively), pig blood (82% and 63%, respectively) and bovine blood (40% and 53%). In addition, P. mixtum fed readily on duck blood (59%). A discussion of host preference based on field observations and the present results examined some aspects of host-seeking as related to feeding preferences. Preliminary experiments were carried out on the effects of light and possible circadian rhythms on the feeding rates of P. mixtum and S. vittatum.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7679
Item ID: 7679
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 74-89
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: 1979
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Simuliidae; Simulium vittatum; Prosilium mixtum

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