An investigation of the practices, problems, and potential associated with computer generated master scheduling for high schools in Newfoundland and Labrador

Price, Joseph (1974) An investigation of the practices, problems, and potential associated with computer generated master scheduling for high schools in Newfoundland and Labrador. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the present practices and problems of scheduling high schools in St. John’s, Newfoundland. Additionally, this study attempted to determine the potential of computer developed master schedules for Newfoundland high schools. A set of ten research questions was considered to achieve the objectives of this study. The questions dealt with scheduling procedures, scheduling practices, scheduling problems, schedule adequacy, scheduling alternates, schedule experimentation, computer scheduling advantages and computer scheduling disadvantages. -- An interview was conducted in each of four St. John’s high schools. The interviews dealt with data relevant to existing schedules. The second phase of the study resulted in the production of a computer schedule for Lester Pearson Memorial High School. This schedule was compared with the school’s manual schedule. Data from the interviews and schedules were analyzed and reported within the framework of the research questions. -- Findings from the analyses of the data were as follows: -- 1. All schools used the hand mosaic method of schedule construction. -- 2. No significant difference existed in the scheduling practices of the schools. -- 3. Several problems such as workload problems, inadequate guidance services, standard periods, unresolved conflicts, and rigid schedules were identified by the school administrators. -- 4. All principals stated that their schedules were inadequate. -- 5. Experimentation is practically non-existent in the high schools. -- 6. Many disadvantages such as a long scheduling period, increased costs, large numbers of unscheduled periods, uniform scheduling, and the clustering of courses were revealed in the computer generated schedule. -- The major recommendations arising out of the study were: -- 1. School districts should provide in-service programs on scheduling for their principals. -- 2. Memorial University of Newfoundland should provide at least one course in scheduling for graduate students in Administration. -- 3. The Department of Education should assume a leadership role in the utilization of computers for high school master scheduling. -- 4. Computer scheduling should not be implemented in high schools in the near future. -- 5. This study should be replicated to determine the potential of computers in high schools in the province. -- 6. School administrators should be conscious of curricular innovations in high schools. Experimentation with these concepts should be conducted with a view to improving instructional patterns in schools.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7413
Item ID: 7413
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves [250]-257.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1974
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Data processing--Schedules, School; Schedules, School--Newfoundland and Labrador

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