Visual speech recognition by recurrent neural networks

Rabi, Gihad (1997) Visual speech recognition by recurrent neural networks. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (12Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

One of the major drawbacks of current acoustically-based speech recognizers is that their performance deteriorates drastically with noise. The focus of this thesis is to develop a computer system that performs speech recognition based on visual information of the speaker. The system automatically extracts visual speech features through image processing techniques that operate on facial images taken in a normally-lluminated environment. To cope with the dynamic nature of change in speech patterns with respect to time as well as the spatial variations in the individual patterns, the recognition scheme proposed in this work uses a recurrent neural network architecture. By specifying a certain behavior when the network is presented with exemplar sequences, the recurrent network is trained with no more than feed-forward complexity. The network's desired behavior is based on characterizing a given word by well-defined segments. Adaptive segmentation is employed to segment the training sequences of a given class. This technique iterates the execution of two steps. First, the sequences are segmented individually. Then, a generalized version of dynamic time warping is used to align the segments of all sequences. At each iteration, the weights of the distance functions used in the two steps are updated in a way that minimizes a segmentation error. The system has been implemented and tested on a few words and the results are satisfactory. In particular, the system has been able to distinguish between words with common segments. Moreover, it tolerates, to a great extent, variable-duration words of the same class.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/739
Item ID: 739
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 115-121
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Computer Science
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Speech processing systems; Neural networks (Computer science)

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics