Co-management in Malawi : comparison of Lake Malombe and Lake Chiuta

Davis, Carla (2003) Co-management in Malawi : comparison of Lake Malombe and Lake Chiuta. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Malawi is a small developing country that is dependent on fisheries as a source of employment and protein. The country supports an artisanal fishery for both commercial and subsistence use. Centralised management has failed to reduce effort and protect juvenile fish, resulting in declining fish stocks. In an effort to correct problems with these fisheries, co-management has been suggested starting with the test sites. Lake Malombe and Lake Chiuta. This study will look at improvements needed to increase the potential for sustainability by allowing co-management to be integrated into the societal context, focusing on the position of the village headmen and Beach Village Committees. -- Co-management is the evolving institutional process of sharing the management of the fishery among various stakeholders. The capacity and interests of local fishers are complemented by the state's ability to legislate regulations. Co-management can lead to better more informed decision-making and improved resource outcome as measured by efficiency, equity and sustainability. -- Co-management so far in Malawi involves the creation of Beach Village Committees in communities to aid the Department of Fisheries in managing fisheries at the test sites - Lake Malombe and Lake Chiuta. Beach Village Committees in Lake Malombe include the village headmen, and has resulted in fishers being underrepresented in management. After the implementation of co-management there has been an increase in compliance and increased catches. The main benefit is improved communication between the Department of Fisheries and communities. -- In Lake Chiuta, co-management was implemented through a community led initiative in response to the harmful effects of nkacha fishers. Village headmen have not served a major role in the process of co-management. As a result the Beach Village Committees are more often viewed as being representative of the fishers and they are able to present views of those fishers. The main advantage of co-management has been to legitimise de facto regulations. -- To become a part of the society in which these fishers live, co-management needs to have certain qualities. Village headmen need to be removed from Beach Village Committees, although they need to be given other positions of authority within the fishery that their position dictates. As members of lake wide committees they can still gain benefits from the fishery and be involved in dispute resolution. Beach Village Committees need to build on pre-existing social structures. This may mean the inclusion of sadakas and chairmen in Beach Village Committees.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7358
Item ID: 7358
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 79-82.
Department(s): Marine Institute
Date: 2003
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Malawi--Malombe, Lake; Chiuta, Lake (Malawi and Mozambique)
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fishery management--Malawi; Sustainable fisheries--Malawi; Fishery co-management--Malawi--Malombe, Lake; Fishery co-management--Chiuta, Lake (Malawi and Mozambique)

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