A study of student subcultures in five selected Newfoundland high schools

Holloway, Harvey Winston (1975) A study of student subcultures in five selected Newfoundland high schools. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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Abstract

Several studies in adolescent social development have yielded evidence of separate and distinct subcultures among students while at high school. In particular evidence has suggested that student attitudes and values are not conducive to academic achievement as one of the school’s main goals. -- This study has attempted to determine whether separate student subcultures exist in some of Newfoundland’s high schools, and whether the attitude and values prevalent among students here are at variance with the school’s educational goals. The study was undertaken as a replication of one carried out in Western Canada by David Friesen and as such applies his theoretical framework and hypotheses to the Newfoundland setting. In short, the framework and hypotheses contend that if such a subculture exists, then students share and maintain their own system of activities, attitudes and values which are different from those of the larger society, and that these activities, attitudes and values are influenced more by internal (peer-group) than external (adult) sources. In addition to examining the subculture hypothesis, the study also made direct comparisons between the two samples in order to determine if the situation in local schools was comparable to that found in Western Canada. -- The sample consisted of 816 students from five high schools in grades ten and eleven. The schools were selected to obtain representation from urban and rural communities; coeducational and sex-segregated institutions, and institutions administered by the Roman Catholic and by the Integrated school board authorities. -- The activities, attitudes and values of the students were depicted by means of their responses to a questionnaire developed from that used in the Western Canadian study to more appropriately fit the Newfoundland situation. The responses were examined for boys and girls separately, for individual schools, and for all schools taken together. -- The responses of the Newfoundland boys and girls as in the Western Canadian sample did not lend strong support for the separate subculture hypothesis, and students appeared no to be unaware of, or unconcerned about, the importance of academic success. Although the peer-group represented a major source of influence for students it was but one of a number of sources. Parents, the church, and school were also important.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7343
Item ID: 7343
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 112-119.
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1975
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Students--Attitudes

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