Hockey Night in Canada: the impact of a television program on white-collar workers

Ozon, Eugene R. (1973) Hockey Night in Canada: the impact of a television program on white-collar workers. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

As media theorists neglect the temporal aspects of the effect of television and survey analysts probe this medium in generalized fashion, a fundamental consequence of television is overlooked - the effects of a specific program on particular segments of society. Searching for a suitable program from which to explore this problem, I selected Hockey Night in Canada, the twice-weekly telecast of National Hockey League games which has persisted as the top Canadian television program for more than twelve years. -- My initial hypothesis was that the effect of Hockey Night in Canada on the social and family lives of the white-collar workers in any city (especially St. John's) varied directly with their degree of interest in the program. The effects of the program influence their interpersonal relationships to such a degree that they are unaware of its total impact. -- The lack of sociological research in this area left me with few guidelines on how to gather data bearing on my hypothesis. The method of questionnaire survey was ultimately selected as the most workable approach. The enduring problems of a new major professional hockey league and a historic series between Canada and Russia which may have affected viewers' response, I believe, have been successfully controlled.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7234
Item ID: 7234
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 88-92.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Sociology
Date: April 1973
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Hockey Night in Canada; Television viewers--Canada

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