A study of the relationship between selected personal and organizational variables and adoption of an innovation

Jain, Keshar (1973) A study of the relationship between selected personal and organizational variables and adoption of an innovation. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

The main problem of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected personal and organizational variables and adoption of an innovation. The purpose of this study was to obtain information useful to the effort of introducing innovations in the public denominational schools of Newfoundland. -- A questionnaire was devised, pre-tested, and mailed to the sample which consisted of one hundred elementary school teachers employed by the Avalon Consolidated School Board for St. John's. Forty seven per cent of the questionnaires forwarded to the subjects were returned fully completed and entirely usable for the analysis. -- The relationship between personal variables and adoption of innovation was determined by testing the observed frequencies with the help of Chi-Square tests. To determine the relationship between organizational variables and adoption of innovation, scores were tested by using t tests of significance. -- The findings of this study revealed that there was no significant relationship between personal variables and adoption of an innovation. This finding indicated that adoption of an innovation by a teacher was independent of his age, sex, education, income, or teaching experience. -- This study further suggested that the superintendent's support for the innovation was not necessary for a teacher to become interested in the innovation and to evaluate it for its applicability. However, teachers tended to try the innovation on a small scale to determine its usefulness, and also they tended to adopt it, when they thought that the superintendent supported the innovation. -- The findings further revealed that the six organizational variables (perceived change-orientation of the principal, perceived vertical communication with the principal, perceived relationship with the principal, perceived level of participation in decision-making, perceived principal's support for the innovation, and perceived students' benefit from the innovation) were significantly related with the adoption of an innovation. These findings indicated that the teachers were more likely to take interest in the innovation, evaluate, try, and adopt it when they thought that the principal was change-oriented, that the principal talked to them about relevant subject matters, that there was a good relationship between them and the principal, that they could participate meaningfully in decision-making activities in the school, that the principal supported the innovation, and that the students benefited from the innovation used. -- It was concluded that in order to promote educational change, the principal should openly demonstrate his interest in innovations, and the staff should be encouraged to participate in decision-making activities. A friendly and understanding relationship between the principal and teachers should be encouraged.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7204
Item ID: 7204
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves [71]-75
Department(s): Education, Faculty of
Date: 1973
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Educational innovations

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