Marine stock enhancement : a critical review of the past and a look to the future within coastal community-based marine reserves

Spencer, Nicole J. C. (2003) Marine stock enhancement : a critical review of the past and a look to the future within coastal community-based marine reserves. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (3365Kb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

The diversity of life in the oceans is being radically changed by the rapidly increasing and potentially irreparable consequences of human activity. Past and present methods of fisheries management globally are ineffective in mitigating the problems and pressure being inflicted on the marine environment. With the human population growing and the abundance of protein in the oceans declining, it is apparent that a new form of integrated management be established for the marine ecosystem. This new way of managing could be possible with the integration of Marine Stock Enhancement science and Marine Protected Areas. Though current enhancement projects are on the rise, they are concentrated in artificially rearing and releasing fish into the wild. This can negatively affect the functioning of reproduction of the system in a number of ways. A promising alternate approach would be Enhancement of Reproductive Potential, by way of 'catch, grow-out and release'. The method aims at improving recruitment of a fish population by growing out wild produced juvenile and then releasing them back into the wild after a period of time, inflicting no detriment to the system. This technique enables the fish to grow faster than their wild counterparts and potentially reaching sexual maturity in less time. Under the protection of a regulated Marine Protected Area this method could prove to be effective in restoring fish populations in coastal waters, while at the same time economically benefiting local communities by way of sustainable fisheries and tourism. An integrated approach to the management of the oceans is necessary to reach the common goal of restoring and maintaining a diverse marine environment for the future and conserving an important resource.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7035
Item ID: 7035
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 58-64.
Department(s): Marine Institute > School of Fisheries
Date: 2003
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Ocean
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Fish stocking; Fish culture; Marine parks and reserves

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics