Tracking influenza immunization in the community

Porter, Suzette (2003) Tracking influenza immunization in the community. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of using three different influenza immunization surveillance forms in accounting for all influenza vaccine distributed in a community setting. Methods: All family practice physicians and community health nurses (CHNs) in the Eastern Region of Newfoundland and Labrador were randomly sent one of three influenza immunization surveillance forms: individual, tally or government. They were asked to: document case information about patients given influenza vaccine in the 2001-2002 season, return completed forms as well as unused vaccine, and provide feedback about the forms at the end of the study. Results: There was 100% participation by CHNs and 82.4% by physicians. Of the 13,310 doses of influenza vaccine distributed, 7,645 (57.5%) doses were accounted for using the surveillance forms. Use of the government form accounted for statistically significantly more influenza vaccine than use of the tally and individual forms (p< 0.0005), while the tally form accounted for significantly more vaccine than the individual form (p< 0.0005). The tally and individual forms provided more information than the government form about those who received the vaccine. Feedback identified that health care professionals preferred less paper and fewer questions, but supported influenza immunization surveillance. Conclusion: The study's findings supports using a tally form as a way to collect useful influenza immunization surveillance data in future influenza immunization seasons.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/7026
Item ID: 7026
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 125-131.
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: 2003
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador, Eastern
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Influenza vaccines; Influenza--Newfoundland and Labrador--Prevention
Medical Subject Heading: Influenza Vaccines; Influenza, Human--Newfoundland and Labrador--prevention & control

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