The late quaternary history of Terra Nova National Park and vicinity, northeast Newfoundland

Sommerville, Anne A. (1997) The late quaternary history of Terra Nova National Park and vicinity, northeast Newfoundland. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

The Quaternary history of Terra Nova National Park and vicinity, northeast Newfoundland, is dominated by Late Wisconsinan glaciation, glaciofluvial activity, post-glacial sea level fluctuations, and Holocene climate change. The eastern part of the study region is dominated by glacial erosional landforms, comprising thin veneers of fine-textured diamicton. To the west, eskers and glaciofluvial terraces are prominent, and the area is mantled by till and glaciofluvial deposits. -- Late Wisconsinan glaciation was marked by flow towards the northeast and glaciogenic sediments contain high proportions of Terra Nova Granite and other locally-derived erratics. Primary and reworked glacial diamictons are present. The primary deposits reflect local ice flow movements rather than the regional ice flow movement towards the northeast. Glaciofluvial deposits include eskers, proximal and distal braided stream sequences, as well as associated pond sediments. Glacial retreat from Terra Nova National Park occurred after 12,000 years BP. -- The marine limit is approximately 39 m asl, as indicated by raised deltas at Traytown and Sandy Cove. Marine incursion occurred at St. Chad's about 12,400 years BP. After 12,000 years BP, isostatic recovery resulted in the marine regression to modern sea level about 10,000 years BP, and to a minimum of -17 m by about 8,600 years BP. Ice-wedge casts preserved at 16 m asl at Port Blandford indicate the existence of a cold climate interval between 11,000 and 10,000 years BP. This is coincident with the Younger Dryas cool event. -- Sea level rose throughout the mid- and late-Holocene, reaching its present position about 2,000 years BP. Climate fluctuations during the late Holocene resulted in the expansion of wetlands throughout Terra Nova National Park.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6943
Item ID: 6943
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 237-261.
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Geography
Date: 1997
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador--Terra Nova National Park
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Glacial landforms--Newfoundland and Labrador--Terra Nova National Park; Geology, Stratigraphic--Quaternary; Terra Nova National Park (N.L.)

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