Awareness, reported behaviour, and dietary intake of fat and fiber as risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Maloney, Kelly Veronica (2000) Awareness, reported behaviour, and dietary intake of fat and fiber as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

This study is a secondary analysis of data collected by the Nutrition Newfoundland and Labrador Survey. It specifically analyzed data collected from adults to address three issues: 1) respondents' awareness of dietary fat and fiber as a cardiovascular risk factor 2) respondents' reported behaviours of avoiding fat and choosing fiber in their diet and 3) respondents' dietary intakes of high fat and high fiber foods as reported in the Food Frequency Questionnaire. The study population included non-institutionalized, 18 to 74 year-old adults living in Metropolitan St. John's. A Chi Square test was used to analyze the associations between awareness, reported behaviour, and dietary intake with socio-demographic variables. The Chi Square test was also used to analyze the association between respondents' awareness, reported behaviours, and dietary intakes. -- There was a greater reported awareness of the link between heart disease and eating fewer high-fat foods (76.5%) as compared to heart disease and eating more high-fiber foods (46.7%). Sex was the only demographic variable tested which was significantly associated with the respondent's awareness that reducing dietary fat is associated with the prevention of heart disease. Female respondents reported a higher awareness. Respondents who were older, female, more highly educated, and with a higher income most often reported that they were avoiding foods because of the fat content. A larger and significant proportion of respondents who were older and female reported that they were choosing foods because of the fiber content. Age and sex were both significantly associated with dietary intake of fat. A larger percentage of respondents who were older and female were in the lower dietary intake of fat category. -- There was a significant association between awareness and reported behaviour for fiber but not fat. Respondents who had a greater awareness were choosing foods because of the fiber content. Significant positive associations were found between reported behaviour and dietary intake of both fat and fiber. There was no significant association between awareness and dietary intake of fat or fiber. -- This research suggests that knowledge alone does not determine behaviour. Nutrition educators should focus on the many barriers to behaviour change to develop more effective strategies for nutrition programs.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6535
Item ID: 6535
Additional Information: Bibliography: leaves 111-118.
Department(s): Medicine, Faculty of
Date: 2000
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada--Newfoundland and Labrador--Avalon Peninsula--St. John's
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Cardiovascular system--Diseases--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's--Nutritional aspects; Heart--Diseases--Risk factors--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Lipids in human nutrition--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's; Fiber in human nutrition--Newfoundland and Labrador--St. John's
Medical Subject Heading: Cardiovascular Diseases; Dietary Fats--adverse effects; Dietary Fiber--adverse effects; Health Behavior; Risk Factors

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