A multidimensional profile of Canadians with social anxiety disorder: sociodemographics, social support, and stress

MacKenzie, Meagan (2014) A multidimensional profile of Canadians with social anxiety disorder: sociodemographics, social support, and stress. Doctoral (PhD) thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

This dissertation was designed to present a multidimensional profile of determinants of well-being for individuals with social anxiety disorder. Using the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) cycle 2.1, a series of three studies was conducted. Study 1 examined prevalence rates and associated sociodemographic variables for social anxiety disorder. It was found that individuals with this disorder experience significant depression comorbidity, as well as impairment in domains such as education, employment, and income. Females with social anxiety disorder may be more marginalized, as they are more likely to be single parents and have a lower income than males with the disorder. Study 2 examined social support within the context of social anxiety disorder. It was found that both socially anxious males and females had low levels of perceived social support, and that males reported lower social support than females. For females with social anxiety disorder, a reduction in distress was associated with an increase in positive social interactions. Finally, Study 3 examined variables related to stress and coping for individuals with social anxiety disorder. It was shown that this disorder is associated with lower coping self-efficacy, a specific pattern of sources of stress, and using different coping methods than non-socially anxious individuals. Females with social anxiety disorder were likely to report their most important sources of stress to be related to their families and males with social anxiety disorder were more likely to list work as a stressor, and were more likely to drink alcohol to cope. Taken together, these findings indicate that individuals with social anxiety disorder have additional variables affecting their quality of life beyond that of their social anxiety. These findings can be of benefit to practitioners, as it provides a more complete illustration of the lives of their patients. This knowledge, particularly concerning stress and coping variables, can be of use in treatment planning. As a result of this study, further research might investigate additional determinants of well-being, such as physical ailments and quality of social support.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral (PhD))
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6505
Item ID: 6505
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 109-133).
Keywords: social anxiety disorder, prevalence, demographics, gender, social support, stress, coping, quality of life
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: May 2014
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Canada
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Social phobia--Patients--Canada--Psychology; Depressed persons--Social networks--Canada; Depressed persons--Services for--Canada; Quality of life--Canada

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