Single Rapamycin Administration Induces Prolonged Downward Shift in Defended Body Weight in Rats

Hebert, Mark and Licursi, Maria and Jensen, Brittany and Baker, Ashley and Milway, Steve and Malsbury, Charles and Grant, Virginia L. and Adamec, Robert and Hirasawa, Michiru and Blundell, Jacqueline (2014) Single Rapamycin Administration Induces Prolonged Downward Shift in Defended Body Weight in Rats. PLoS ONE, 9 (5). ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Manipulation of body weight set point may be an effective weight loss and maintenance strategy as the homeostatic mechanism governing energy balance remains intact even in obese conditions and counters the effort to lose weight. However, how the set point is determined is not well understood. We show that a single injection of rapamycin (RAP), an mTOR inhibitor, is sufficient to shift the set point in rats. Intraperitoneal RAP decreased food intake and daily weight gain for several days, but surprisingly, there was also a long-term reduction in body weight which lasted at least 10 weeks without additional RAP injection. These effects were not due to malaise or glucose intolerance. Two RAP administrations with a two week interval had additive effects on body weight without desensitization and significantly reduced the white adipose tissue weight. When challenged with food deprivation, vehicle and RAP-treated rats responded with rebound hyperphagia, suggesting that RAP was not inhibiting compensatory responses to weight loss. Instead, RAP animals defended a lower body weight achieved after RAP treatment. Decreased food intake and body weight were also seen with intracerebroventricular injection of RAP, indicating that the RAP effect is at least partially mediated by the brain. In summary, we found a novel effect of RAP that maintains lower body weight by shifting the set point long-term. Thus, RAP and related compounds may be unique tools to investigate the mechanisms by which the defended level of body weight is determined; such compounds may also be used to complement weight loss strategy.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6438
Item ID: 6438
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 2014
Date Type: Publication
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