Eating disorder subtypes differ in their rates of psychosocial improvement over treatment

Kelly, Allison C. and Carter, Jacqueline C. (2014) Eating disorder subtypes differ in their rates of psychosocial improvement over treatment. Journal of Eating Disorders, 2 (2). ISSN 2050-2974

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Abstract

Background: Individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) are renowned for their poor short- and long-term treatment outcomes. To gain more insight into the reasons for these poor outcomes, the present study compared patients with AN-R (restrictive subtype), AN-BP (binge-purge subtype), bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) over 12 weeks of specialized eating disorders treatment. Eighty-nine patients completed the Eating Disorder Examination- Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and various measures of psychosocial functioning at baseline, and again after weeks 3, 6, 9, and 12 of treatment. Results: Multilevel modeling revealed that, over the 12 weeks, patients with AN-BP and AN-R had slower improvements in global eating disorder pathology, shape concerns, and self-compassion than those with EDNOS and BN. Patients with AN-BP had slower improvements in shame, social safeness (i.e., feelings of warmth in one’s relationships), and received social support compared to those with AN-R, BN, and EDNOS. Conclusions: These findings support the need for more effective and comprehensive clinical interventions for patients with AN and especially AN-BP. Results also highlight not-yet studied processes that might contribute to the poor outcomes AN patients often face during and after treatment.

Item Type: Article
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6430
Item ID: 6430
Additional Information: Memorial University Open Access Author's Fund
Keywords: Anorexia nervosa, Transdiagnostic, Treatment process, Treatment outcome, Change trajectories, Self-compassion, Received social support, Shame, Social safeness
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Psychology
Science, Faculty of > Psychology
Date: 13 January 2014
Date Type: Publication
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