Discharge information and its relationship to auality of care and transition outcomes following short stay hysterectomy: a pilot study

Narduzzi, Kate M. (2014) Discharge information and its relationship to auality of care and transition outcomes following short stay hysterectomy: a pilot study. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Vaginal or laparoscopic hysterectomy performed as day surgery has been broadly welcomed but this can diminish the time and opportunity for discharge nursing education leaving patients potentially under prepared to recover at home. It is unknown if the current discharge information and teaching is meeting clients’ needs following short stay hysterectomy and what effect this has on satisfaction with care and recovery outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between and among a set of variables: discharge information provided, perception of discharge information received, overall satisfaction with short hospital stay experience, satisfaction with discharge information, perceived confidence in self-care and post-operative recovery following short stay hysterectomy procedures. An integrated model of Donabedian’s Quality of Care Model and Schumacher and Meleis’s Nursing Model of Transitions was the guiding framework for this descriptive correlational study. Fifty one women, aged between 23 and 71, who underwent a short stay hysterectomy procedure, were contacted 48 to 72 hours after discharge for a telephone interview. Quantitative data analysis indicated that most women were satisfied to very satisfied with the short stay experience and with the discharge education they received. There was a high positive correlation between the discharge information provided and the perception of the discharge information received(r = 0.85). Women recovering at home scored themselves as having high levels of self-care confidence but reported varying levels of post-surgical recovery. The best predictor of self-care confidence was satisfaction with discharge information (adjusted R² = 27%) and the best predictor of post-operative recovery was self-care confidence (adjusted R² = 22%). Findings from this study support the important role of discharge teaching for short stay hysterectomy patients. As well, the implications for nursing practice, education and research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6411
Item ID: 6411
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 112-136).
Department(s): Nursing, School of
Date: May 2014
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Hysterectomy--Nursing; Patient discharge instructions; Hospital care--Evaluation; Uterus--Surgery--Patients--Rehabilitation

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