From workplace to home space: archaeology at the James M. Rogers sawmill, Scots Bay, Nova Scotia (BhDc-16)

Morrison, Adrian (2014) From workplace to home space: archaeology at the James M. Rogers sawmill, Scots Bay, Nova Scotia (BhDc-16). Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

[img] [English] PDF (Migrated (PDF/A Conversion) from original format: (application/pdf)) - Accepted Version
Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.

Download (135Mb)
  • [img] [English] PDF - Accepted Version
    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

When Nova Scotia’s lumber industry peaked in the mid to late nineteenth century, water powered sawmills could be found on essentially every river, brook, or stream in the province. While large-scale sawmills were important to the greater economy, mills varied in size and function: there were hundreds of small, family-run operations sawing for local use. Regardless of size, most were influential to their immediate communities, providing employment and necessary building materials. In an effort to learn more about these small-scale enterprises, and their wider implications, an archaeological investigation was carried out the site of the James M. Rogers Sawmill (BhDc-16), in Scots Bay, Kings County. Built in the late 1850s or early 1860s, the James M. Rogers Sawmill was used opportunistically to supplement an income made primarily through agricultural activities. Research at the site focused on three primary objectives: determining the layout and scale of the mill; establishing the operation’s function within its owners overall economic strategy; and situating the sawmill within Scots Bay’s wider industrial economy.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6378
Item ID: 6378
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (pages 135-146).
Department(s): Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of > Archaeology
Date: May 2014
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Scots Bay (N.S.)
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Sawmills--Nova Scotia--Scots Bay--History--19th century; Scots Bay (N.S.)--Economic conditions--19th century; Scots Bay (N.S.)--Antiquities; Home economics--Nova Scotia--Scots Bay--History--19th century

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over the past year

View more statistics