What comes down must go up: assessing the validity of stream connectivity techniques with the use of in situ fish movement and stream community metrics

Mahlum, Shad (2014) What comes down must go up: assessing the validity of stream connectivity techniques with the use of in situ fish movement and stream community metrics. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Stream fragmentation is considered an important factor in the persistence of many aquatic species. My research is focused on validating local and riverscape metrics of connectivity to help assist in evaluating their efficacy. I used in situ brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) movements in Terra Nova National Park, Newfoundland, to determine the accuracy of local scale fish passability metrics and I used community assemblages in southern Ontario to evaluate a structural index used to measure the connectedness of a system. I found that local scales of passability were conservative in predicting brook trout passage and failed to consistently predict fish movement. Furthermore, I found that riverscape scale structural indices have power in explaining both community structure, species presence/absence and abundance. The results from my research will provide researchers future areas of study along with confidence in structural indices for the evaluation of watershed level connectivity metrics.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6345
Item ID: 6345
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords: FishXing, brook trout, Dendritic Connectivity Index, passability, community structure, structural indices
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: May 2014
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Brook trout--Locomotion; Fragmented landscapes; Wildlife crossings; Culverts

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