Comparison of DP performance prediction techniques for scaled models

Very, Stephen P. (2012) Comparison of DP performance prediction techniques for scaled models. Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
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Abstract

Utilization of Dynamic Positioning (DP) systems for offshore exploration and production of hydrocarbons is increasing due to the need to exploit deeper water depths, where mooring becomes less feasible. In conducting analysis or predictions for DP System performance, there are three common techniques: experimental investigations at reduced scale, using a simplified mooring system without thrusters; similarly scaled experiments using active DP thrusters; or, time or frequency domain numerical simulations. This paper identifies differences in DP system performance estimates, provided by each of the three methods, by using each method to analyze the same system, in identical wind and wave environments. Experiments were completed using a 1:40 scale model of a typical 99,000t monohull drillship equipped with an active DP system consisting of six azimuthing thrusters. These experiments were repeated with the vessel unpowered on two mooring systems with different stiffnesses. Physical experimental results are then compared to time-domain numerical simulations completed using Oceanic Consulting Corporation's DP simulation program. A comparison of system performance predictions provided by each method is presented.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6188
Item ID: 6188
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 58-60).
Department(s): Engineering and Applied Science, Faculty of
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Offshore structures--Alaska--Anchorage--Simulation methods; Ships--Dynamic positioning systems--Simulation methods; Offshore structures--Dynamics;

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