General patterns among generalists: what is revealed by spatial models of coyotes?

McCue, Anthony J. (2012) General patterns among generalists: what is revealed by spatial models of coyotes? Masters thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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    Available under License - The author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
    (Original Version)

Abstract

Colonization of insular Newfoundland by coyotes ( Canis latrans ) coincided with declines in woodland caribou ( Rangifer tarandus caribou ) populations, generating public outcry to reduce coyote predation on this iconic species. My research was focused on the Maritime Barrens Ecoregion of Newfoundland, which is more akin to an arctic habitat than the desert, plains, or forest habitats typically occupied by coyotes. I investigated both habitat associations and spatial stability of coyotes in relation to short-distance migratory caribou. I compared efficacy between statistical and algorithmic spatial models incorporating relatively static habitat and environmental data for predicting patterns of use. The algorithmic model was superior for predicting future use with the limited background data. However, the best predictive model showed substantial individual variation, possibly reflecting local availability of food resources emphasizing the need to collect these data. Coyote home ranges were relatively static across seasons and years. Overall coyotes appeared to exhibit adaptive and opportunistic behaviour common throughout the species range.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
URI: http://research.library.mun.ca/id/eprint/6152
Item ID: 6152
Additional Information: Includes bibliographical references.
Keywords: boosted regression trees; Canis latrans; coyote; geographic information system; Global Positioning System; Maritime Barrens Ecoregion; mixed-effects model; Newfoundland; resource selection model
Department(s): Science, Faculty of > Biology
Date: 2012
Date Type: Submission
Geographic Location: Newfoundland and Labrador
Library of Congress Subject Heading: Coyote--Home range--Newfoundland and Labrador; Coyote--Ecology--Newfoundland and Labrador; Coyote--Adaptation--Newfoundland and Labrador; Caribou--Effect of predation on--Newfoundland and Labrador;

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